Poppeman

Pictus 1.2.3 released

April 14th, 2015

Pictus 1.2.3 fixes a bug where panning was fairly broken for rotated images. Apologies for that!

Pictus 1.2.2 released

March 7th, 2015

Pictus 1.2.2 fixes various GIF animation bugs, some fairly rare minor issues and improves performance when viewing large images.

Pictus 1.2.1 released

January 2nd, 2015

Pictus 1.2.1 fixes a crash bug introduced in the previous version. It also fixes a bunch of broken characters in the Swedish translation.

Pictus 1.2.0 released

December 25th, 2014

A new version of Pictus is available. New stuff:

  • Keyboard shortcuts for 100% zoom (numeric 1) and reset zoom (0)
  • Updated libpng due to possible security vulnerability
  • Portable mode
  • Rendering improvements

To put Pictus in portable mode, just place a file named “Pictus.ini” next to the executable. Pictus should detect and use that file instead for settings instead of storing settings under AppData.

Project migrated to GitHub

September 8th, 2014

This is not of much interest to most visitors, but the Pictus source is now hosted on GitHub, rather than in a boring old zip archive. There’s also an issue handling system over there for those who stumble into bugs. Contributions of (nearly) all kinds are quite welcome!

Pictus 1.1.6 – Minor maintenance update

August 17th, 2014

I just released a minor update to Pictus. It only fixes an issue in the viewer, so those who are only interested in thumbnails shouldn’t notice anything new in this version.

  • BUGFIX: Transparency was broken for 8-bit images.

Pictus 1.1.5 – First release in four years

July 10th, 2014

Long time no see! As I fairly explicitly noted in my previous post, Pictus development have been pretty much abandoned. If nothing else, no updates in four years should have been a good indicator! Despite this, Pictus is a lot more popular now compared to when I was actually developing it. I’m not entirely comfortable with supplying such an old version of Pictus, so that leaves me with either pulling the plug or putting some sort of effort into basic maintenance. I have decided to go for the latter.

Currently I’m not up for actually adding features but I’m quite willing to fix bugs. I have squished quite a few already in development, but I can only fix those I’ve run into myself (or have managed to identify during code inspection). I am dogfooding Pictus, but that will only uncover bugs for features and configurations I use. If you have run into any notable issues or bugs, send me an e-mail or post a comment below. I would also love it if you mentioned what you use Pictus for. According to analytics, most of you are only interested in getting PSD (Photoshop) thumbnails in Windows. I am considering to make a separate download that only contains the component needed for thumbnails, but explicitly hearing requests for this would make the decision slightly easier.

What is new in Pictus 1.1.5

The update I’m working will be released when I have fixed all known notable issues and when I am confident that it’s a notable improvement stability-wise. A very incomplete list of release highlights follow:

  • BUGFIX: Everything looks blurry on high-DPI displays.
  • BUGFIX: Pictus can appear on the wrong monitor when you enter fullscreen mode.
  • BUGFIX: Installation can hang, resulting in a semi-installed state.
  • BUGFIX: PSD images with multiple alpha channels don’t show up.
  • BUGFIX: GIF animations stops playing after a few minutes.
  • 64-bit builds now support larger images.
  • License is now MIT, was previously somewhat ambiguous.

“Unfortunately”, Windows XP will no longer be supported. There was a fair bit of code specific for Windows XP, and I’m not willing to maintain that for a single version of a discontinued operating system. According to visitor statistics, a vast majority of you have migrated to Windows Vista or newer anyway. I hope that I can get the code up on github or similar later on, but that’s not fast or simple process. The biggest issue is the test data, as I do not necessarily have permission to redistribute all of it.

A tale of two skiddies

June 17th, 2014

Apologies for the recent downtime, a skiddie decided to deface my site. The entire server is now restored from an earlier backup, everything have been updated and all non-essential plugins have been disabled.

One month later

May 14th, 2010

Last month I was hoping my commute would be shorter by now (which would potentially free up time for Pictus), but that’s not the case yet. However a promise is a promise, so I’ve decided to release Pictus as open source under the MIT license. This should be compatible with pretty much any reasonable license, but if you want me to add another license I’m open to suggestions.

The original plan was to host the source on google code, but after failing the 7 MB import multiple times in a row I opted to host it here for the time being.

So far it’s only the source for 1.0.4 (1.1.4), but I might upload the 1.2-dev source once I find a compiling, decently functional revision.

Source for 1.0.4/1.1.4

You’ll need these libraries:
Boost
Libtiff
zlib
libpng

If you want to run the tests you’ll need this one as well:
UnitTest++

So long, and thanks for all the fish!

Outlook not so good

April 13th, 2010

Greetings!
I’ll start out by treating WordPress as an actual blog rather than a glorified news script by saying that I recently got a job. Because of this, the development for Pictus is currently at a stand-still and I can not at this time say whether or not things will stay like this in the long run. My current plan is to see if I’ll be able to start working again on Pictus in the semi-near future and if failing that, release it as open source. The latter is unfortunately unlikely to improve the situation much, as there are already countless well known and active FOSS projects that developers can contribute to instead. I’ll try to post an update in about a month or so with a more concrete decision.

I’ll try to end this post with a slightly more positive spin by posting a screenshot of the current development build. Not visible in this static image is that the toolbar fades away when the cursor isn’t near the toolbar location. Also, rendering was being rewritten to be fully hardware accelerated.
Early screenshot of the new overlay toolbar
Unfortunately, it’s quite far away from being release-worthy.